Tag Archives: Endeavour

Cracking the Morse code

British actors Dakota Blue Richards and Lewis Peek tease the return of Inspector Morse prequel Endeavour for a fifth season, while also discussing life on set and the impact of the #MeToo campaign.

It’s strange to recall that, when it was first commissioned, Endeavour was intended as a one-off special marking the 25th anniversary of long-running detective drama Morse. As if its popularity would ever be in doubt: since that 2012 prequel, a further 16 feature-length films have aired on UK broadcaster ITV over the last four years.

It’s a sign of the show’s continuing success, with Shaun Evans taking the lead as the young Endeavour Morse, that the upcoming fifth season has been extended to six films, also proving that traditional ‘whodunnits’ like this and Midsomer Murders are far from antiquated in the face of competition from modern serialised crime dramas.

The new season, which begins in the UK on February 4, opens in 1968 with the recently promoted Detective Sergeant Morse facing changing times as Oxford City Police merges with another constabulary. His personal life also faces challenges as Joan Thursday (Sara Vickers) returns to Oxford, with many issues unresolved following her disappearance last season and Morse’s unexpected proposal.

Other returning characters include Roger Allam as Detective Chief Inspector Fred Thursday, Anton Lesser as Chief Superintendent Reginald Bright, Dakota Blue Richards as WPC Shirley Trewlove, Sean Rigby as Sergeant Jim Strange, James Bradshaw as Dr Max DeBryn, Caroline O’Neil as Win Thursday and Abigail Thaw as Dorothea Frazil.

Endeavour stars Shaun Evans as Endeavour Morse

But Morse’s life is further complicated by the arrival of a new recruit, Detective Constable George Fancy, whom he reluctantly agrees to mentor.

“He’s not happy about that,” actor Lewis Peek says of Morse’s reaction to his new partner. “[Fancy is] like a puppy: he’s eager to please and a bit naive. He’s got really good intentions and sometimes things don’t really go the way he planned.”

Try as he might, Fancy’s attempts to win Morse over don’t entirely go to plan, the offer of a lunchtime drink in particular going down like a lead balloon.

“He definitely comes from a completely different background than Morse,” Peek says. “In the first episode, he tries to suss out Morse but he doesn’t give a great impression. Then he’s being very pally with the beers and the social side but he’s not being very professional. He doesn’t really know what to expect and he’s facing this wall of stubbornness from Morse that is very hard to break down.”

Peek and Fancy have a lot in common, not least their Devonshire roots and the fact they are both joining a well-established team. But the actor says his experience joining Endeavour could not have been more different from that of the character he plays.

“It was terrifying, I was very nervous,” he admits. “But I think the nerves at the start helped a bit with the character. He’s new, he’s meeting everyone for the first time. I’m as new as Lewis, to the job and meeting everyone for the first time. I think it helped.

Dakota Blue Richards as WPC Shirley Trewlove

“I remember reading the scenes for the first time and I had a good feeling because I saw a lot of myself in the character when I was at school, and that definitely helped.”

Peek is also clear about what separates Endeavour from other crime series. “It has this class about it,” he says. “The cinematography is exceptional, but what I love about the show is the human nature. It is a detective show but if you’re not caring about the characters, you’re not going to want to watch. It captures real human spirit and emotions, and that’s what draws people in.

As well as the ongoing changes facing the police and a murder to solve, the opening episode of season five is also notable for new arrival Fancy’s attempts to flirt with WPC Trewlove, who clearly isn’t impressed by the new recruit.

“He tries so hard and he has the best of intentions but he just says the wrong thing at every available opportunity,” says Richards, who plays Fancy’s potential love interest. “He definitely has a go at Trewlove but goes about it in completely the wrong way, totally underestimates her and she’s largely unimpressed by his advances. But as the season develops, Trewlove begins to see through his klutziness and takes him under her wing a little bit, whereas Endeavour is not making that effort.”

Richards, who rose to fame as the star of 2007 big-screen adventure The Golden Compass before appearing in Channel 4 teen drama Skins, is a settled member of the Endeavour team, having joined the cast ahead of season three.

Lewis Peek joins the cast for the forthcoming season as DC George Fancy

She points to episode six as her favourite of the forthcoming season, “mostly because it’s the one I’m in the most,” but reveals that viewers can expect to see a much more emotional side to her character.

As to whether WPC Trewlove is facing up to the challenges of being a female police officer in a very male-centric environment, Richards admits the battle for equality “is much more my fight than hers.” The actor continues: “Trewlove’s a hard worker but is acutely aware of the limitations being a woman will put on her. There’s one really lovely scene with Fancy where he says, ‘I feel like I’m invisible.’ And she’s like, ‘Oh, imagine!’ She’s overlooked constantly, despite all her best efforts. But I think she’s come to terms with that and she doesn’t let it show most of the time.”

Richards puts the success of the show – penned by series creator Russell Lewis, produced by Mammoth Screen and distributed by ITV Studios Global Entertainment – down in part to the “fantastic performances” from the cast, and particularly Evans and Allam as the show’s central pairing, Morse and Thursday. “It’s also something about the workings of the human mind and figuring out a mystery that will always draw people’s attention, partly because people like to play along. Everybody loves watching a whodunnit show because they get to guess the murderer. That’s always fun, it feels more interactive.”

Returning to her comments about fighting for equality in the workplace, Richards is of course pointing to the ongoing #MeToo and Time’s Up campaigns supporting gender equality and an end to sexual misconduct, launched in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein allegations and others that have subsequently rocked the film and television industry.

“We need to show support and understanding to everybody that has been a victim of it but we need to be very careful because we are increasingly relying on a trial-by-media, and that is inherently dangerous because that’s not how justice ought to work,” the actor explains. “We need to be very careful about the way in which these very serious issues are dealt with. They need to be dealt with with a level of weight and importance and intelligence I think that the victims deserve and the perpetrators deserve equally.”

The Thick of It star Roger Allam (right) plays DCI Fred Thursday

Richards reveals the issues raised by the campaigns were discussed on the Endeavour set, with the conversation highlighting how prevalent the problem is in the industry.

“Every single woman and some men I know in this industry have been victims of some form of sexual misconduct. Every single one,” the actor says. “The trouble is it’s so ingrained and we need to be very careful about treating just the symptoms and not the disease. I have experienced awful behaviour, really quite appalling behaviour from directors, producers, other actors. Generally the consensus is as long as you are not physically harmed, you just shut up and deal with it because it is so common. But if you complained about every single incident, no one would ever get any work done. That’s the problem we need to be addressing.

“But it’s the same with all the problems in our industry. Racism is inherent in our industry as much as sexism, as much as sexual harassment. We need to really re-evaluate the way we deal with these sorts of things and the way we work with each other. What needs to change is that we need to be able to discuss things more openly. The real problem has been how silenced everyone has been, and that’s what’s allowed it to persist for so long and to get as bad as it has.”

Richards concludes: “The really important thing now is people are being more inspired to come forward. Hopefully we can dig out the worst offenders and hopefully that will inspire discussion and change within the industry, but I think we have an awfully long way to go.”

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BBC1 drama dominates UK viewing

Happy Valley stars Sarah Lancashire (left)
Happy Valley stars Sarah Lancashire (left)

Amid all the controversy about the future of the BBC’s licence fee, it’s interesting to note that the UK public broadcaster’s flagship channel BBC1 has had a storming start to the year in terms of its scripted content. Whether it’s crime, espionage, period or soaps, it’s been delivering on every front.

Go back to the very start of January, for example, and BBC1 achieved an audience in excess of 11 million for its much-publicised Sherlock special. This was ably supported by the launch of War & Peace, which debuted to 8.4 million.

War & Peace continued to perform well throughout January and was joined by schedule stalwarts such as Death in Paradise, EastEnders and Silent Witness – all of which racked up audiences in excess of eight million. The latter show topped the ratings in the second week of January with 8.72 million – impressive when you consider it has been running since 1996.

In the week commencing January 11, BBC1 turned the screw on its rivals further still by launching the latest season of Call the Midwife, which immediately went to the top of the charts with 9.88 million.

Supporting it with eight million-plus viewers were Silent Witness, Death in Paradise and EastEnders, with the complex period drama War & Peace holding up well at 6.6 million. Not quite as strong, but still respectable, was the third season of crime series Shetland, which debuted with more than six million.

Gillian Anderson and Paul Dano in War and Peace
Gillian Anderson and Paul Dano in War and Peace

Late January and early February offered more of the same, but then the week commencing February 8 saw the return of Sally Wainwright’s Happy Valley to a massive 8.63 million viewers. Only Call the Midwife scored higher, bringing in 9.6 million.

For the week commencing February 15, BBC1 upped its game again, with the launch of The Night Manager on Sunday evening. While it wasn’t able to outscore the much-loved midwives, it did debut with 8.25 million, neck and neck with episode two of Happy Valley. This meant the channel’s top five broadcasts were all dramas attracting in excess of 7.5 million viewers (with Shetland still bobbing along nicely at around six million).

The following week, all of the above were rock solid – with The Night Manager actually posting a slight increase to 8.42 million. That in itself is a very impressive achievement, because most dramas shed a million or so after their first episode. By this token, Happy Valley also deserves some credit for managing to keep its second and third episodes well above the eight million mark.

All of the above figures are BARB seven-day data. So we’ve now moved into territory where the latest figures have not yet been released. Instead, we need to look at BARB overnights (which are subject to change once time-shifted viewing is included).

With this proviso, The Night Manager continues to perform strongly. On Sunday, March 6, for example, it faced tough competition from the launch of Julian Fellowes’ new project on ITV, Doctor Thorne, but won convincingly. Around 6.2 million tuned into The Night Manager (overnight score) while 3.8 million opted for Fellowes’ Anthony Trollope adaptation.

ITV's Doctor Thorne is the new series from Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes
ITV’s Doctor Thorne is the new series from Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes

ITV is BBC1’s main commercial rival. So how has it been doing across the same period? On the whole, the picture isn’t quite as healthy.

Coming into the new year, its ratings were led by its soaps, Coronation Street and Emmerdale, with audiences in the 5.5-7 million range. Behind this came crime dramas Endeavour, Vera and Midsomer Murders which, with audiences of around 5-5.5 million, lag behind Silent Witness.

It’s likely to be a similar story for the next few weeks, with Happy Valley’s final episode coming up and The Night Manager still good for a few more episodes. It will be interesting to see if BBC1 can sustain its performance through the spring and summer.

In the US, meanwhile, CBS CEO Les Moonves used the Deutsche Bank 2016 Media, Internet and Telecom Conference in Florida to say: “We have five new shows on this year. I believe all five will be renewed, and we own four of them.”

This comment has been interpreted to refer to Supergirl, Limitless, Code Black, Life in Pieces and Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders. However, there is some uncertainty because CBS also has a TV reboot of Rush Hour coming up. So either Moonves overlooked that show, or it’s already being lined up for the chop – which seems a bit harsh ahead of its actual launch.

In terms of the other five, Supergirl and Limitless were widely expected to get picked up again, as was sitcom Life in Pieces.

Code Black
Code Black has been picked up by UKTV

Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders doesn’t debut until March 16 but, as a spin-off of the popular Criminal Minds franchise, it stands a decent chance of doing well. The show that has, perhaps, dodged a bullet is medical drama Code Black.

With its 18-episode first season now complete, Code Black attracted an average audience of 7.1 million. This isn’t terrible but it is undermined by the fact that the show’s appeal to 18- to 49-year-olds is at the lower end of the CBS spectrum.

The fact it has survived is probably explained by CBS’s need for some classic procedural-style dramas to sit alongside hit series NCIS. If CBS can manage to make Code Black a hit then it will also have a useful asset for its international sales catalogue. The show has already been picked up in the UK by UKTV.

Still in the US, public broadcaster PBS has just given the greenlight to a second season of Mercy Street, its first original drama in more than a decade. A medical series set during the US Civil War, Mercy Street’s first season was executive produced by Ridley Scott, David W Zucker, Lisa Q Wolfinger and David Zabel.

The show debuted with an impressive 5.7 million viewers and its six-episode run was streamed two million times. It trended strongly on Twitter on numerous occasions and its website – filled with factual supporting material – has had more than 600,000 unique visitors since its launch.

Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Josh Radnor in Mercy Street
Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Josh Radnor in Mercy Street, which is heading into season two

“We are thrilled with the overwhelmingly positive response to Mercy Street and the return of high-quality American drama on PBS stations,” said Beth Hoppe, chief programming officer and general manager of general audience programming at PBS. “We’re looking forward to a second season offering more fascinating stories inspired by historical events. The effort from everyone involved, including producers, directors, historical consultants, actors and PBS stations, resulted in an extraordinary series.”

Mercy Street’s first season took place in the spring of 1862 in Alexandria, Virginia, a border town between north and south and the longest-occupied Confederate city of the war. Ruled under martial law, Alexandria was the central melting pot of the region, filled with civilians, female volunteers, doctors, wounded soldiers from both sides, free black people, enslaved and contraband (escaped slaves living behind Union lines) African Americans, prostitutes, speculators and spies.

The show follows the lives of these characters, who collide at Mansion House, the Green family’s luxury hotel, which has been taken over and transformed into a Union Army hospital. Season two picks up directly from the events at the end of the first run’s finale.

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ITV’s Endeavour pays off

Endeavour
Endeavour consistently attracts in excess of six millions viewers

Among the many different TV drama formats that exist on the international market, one that seems to work consistently well for the British TV audience is the feature-length story-of-the-week drama (circa 100 minutes) based around a recurring character. Examples over the years include Inspector Morse, Midsomer Murders, Cracker, Prime Suspect and Sherlock.

UK broadcasters don’t commission these shows in very big numbers, usually in batches of three to five on an annual basis. But the successful ones are so durable that, before you know it, there’s a huge library of episodes that can be repeated ad infinitum and sold to broadcasters around the world. Midsomer Murders, would you believe, now runs to 109 episodes, while Morse – starring the unforgettable John Thaw – racked up 33 episodes.

ITV’s Morse, of course, has given birth to a dynasty of dramas. After the initial series (based on the novels by Colin Dexter), ITV launched a franchise around his sidekick Lewis. And then it turned its attention to the adventures of the young Morse in series called Endeavour – written by Russell Lewis, whose many credits include Kavanagh QC, Sharpe, Hornblower and Marple.

When ITV first announced it was making a pilot of Endeavour in 2012, it would have been easy to complain about broadcaster risk-aversion. But the combination of Morse folklore and 1960s Oxford seemed a dead cert to succeed. And so it has proved – after attracting around 8.2 million viewers for the pilot, the first batch of four films in 2013 pulled in an average audience of around seven million.

Ratings have dipped slightly since then, but not enough to damage the franchise. In 2015, for example, the fourth series attracted an average of 6.3 million viewers and a 22% audience share – which is better than most dramas on British TV. So it’s no real surprise that ITV has just announced a new series will go into production in Spring 2016.

Commenting on the decision, ITV director of drama Steve November said: “We’re delighted with the audience’s reaction to Endeavour. It was an easy decision to recommission due to the quality of the scripts from Russell Lewis and the excellent production values from (producer Mammoth Screen).”

Happy Valley
Sarah Lancashire’s performance in Happy Valley has won wide acclaim

While SVoD and pay TV platforms are currently in the golden age of drama experimentation, the success of Endeavour (when contrasted with ITV’s lacklustre ratings for Jekyll & Hyde and Beowulf: Return to the Shieldlands) is symptomatic of how difficult it is for mainstream commercial networks to be adventurous in their programming choices. This isn’t just an issue in the UK, but also in markets like the US, Germany and France, where there’s a clear difference in audience tastes between the established free networks and subscription TV.

Another positive point worth noting about Endeavour is that is distributed internationally by ITV Studios Global Entertainment (ITVSGE). This means the show is a revenue generator twice over for ITV (unlike Downton Abbey, for example, which was distributed by NBC Universal).

Mammoth Screen’s involvement is also interesting. An ITV-owned production company, Mammoth Screen has developed the kind of track record that would make it very tempting to back if it were a horse. Aside from Endeavour, it has also made Poldark, And Then There Were None and Black Work in recent times. All of that must make ITV feel pretty confident about the prospects for upcoming series Victoria – also produced by Mammoth Screen.

Still in the UK, this week saw the return of Happy Valley, from Red Production for BBC1 and written by Sally Wainwright. The first series is widely regarded as one of the best British dramas of the last few years – so there was some anxiety that the second series might prove to be a let down. However, the new run has started incredibly strongly, attracting 6.5 million viewers for its first episode, the highest for the show so far.

The X-Files
The X-Files’ debut on Channel 5 in the UK brought in 3.35 million viewers

Not only that, the second series is drawing critical acclaim. IMDb’s rating of 9.2 puts the show right up among the best dramas in the business, while The Daily Telegraph was also effusive in its praise. In a five-star review, the paper said: “The plot is already full of suspense and possibilities. Performances were uniformly excellent. Sarah Lancashire was charismatic: fast-talking and teak-tough at work, bursting into tears of anguish when she got home. The cast additions were promisingly classy, too.”

Another strong performance in the UK came from the reboot of Fox US’s iconic series The X-Files, which is airing on Channel 5. The first episode of the six-part show attracted 3.35 million, the highest launch of any US drama on the channel since 2009. In the US, meanwhile, episode four of the new X-Files attracted 8.3 million viewers, very similar to the previous episode’s figure.

Another series that deserves some credit for its remarkable consistency is The CW’s highest-rated show, The Flash. Over the course of a 23-episode first season, the show averaged 3.84 million. Season two started slightly softer, around the 3.5 million mark, but has got stronger as the series has progressed. Now on episode 13, it has just recorded a season high of 3.96m viewers and its highest share of 18- to 49-year-olds to date.

Flash
The Flash continues to draw strong audiences for The CW

The Flash is based on the DC Comics character and is part of a much broader alliance between The CW and DC that is working incredibly well. At the time of writing, The CW’s number-two show is DC’s Legends of Tomorrow (which launched in January), while number three is fellow DC-based show Arrow. The CW, it should be noted, is 50% owned by Warner Bros, which also owns DC.

Linking all three shows are writer/producers Greg Berlanti and Andrew Kreisberg, who were also both involved in CBS’s reboot of DC’s Supergirl. CBS owns the other 50% of The CW, creating another nice link back into the extension of the DC franchise.

Finally, on the programme acquisition front, UK channel BBC4 has acquired Nordic Noir drama Modus from FremantleMedia International. Commenting on the Miso Films-produced drama, Cassian Harrison, editor of BBC Four, said: “BBC Four continues to bring the very best international drama to its audience. With its gripping storyline and rich, complex characters, Modus is a clever, entertaining Saturday night treat.”

Jamie Lynn, FMI exec VP of sales and distribution for EMEA, said the BBC4 pick-up would help boost his company’s international sales effort on the show: “BBC4 is recognised by the international broadcast community for its quality foreign drama and has landed and launched some of the industry’s biggest Scandi titles in its Saturday night slot, all which have gone on to receive worldwide acclaim. This prestigious slot has become a beacon, and when searching for the next big non-English language hit, the international world looks here.”

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