Tag Archives: David Tennant

Angels and demons

Michael Sheen, David Tennant and the cast of Good Omens reflect on starring in the eagerly anticipated adaptation of the hugely popular fantasy novel, under the stewardship of showrunner Neil Gaiman, who co-wrote the book with the late Terry Pratchett.

It’s a bitterly chilly November day and we’re surrounded by bunkers on the decommissioned RAF base of Upper Heyford in the English county of Oxfordshire, once a nuclear weapons site during the Cold War. It all feels unavoidably appropriate for the filming of Good Omens, the six-part adaptation of Neil Gaiman and the late Terry Pratchett’s apocalyptic comedy. Telling the story of an angel and a demon who, having grown to love Earth, join forces to prevent the coming of age of the Antichrist (an unwitting 11-year-old called Adam, living quietly in rural Oxfordshire) and the End of Days.

L to R: Douglas Mackinnon, David Tennant, Michael Sheen and Neil Gaiman

Its co-creator is, inevitably and aptly, dressed in regulation black and fizzing with delight at how the shoot, now at its halfway stage, is going under director Douglas Mackinnon. “We have the best cast I’ve ever worked with,” says Gaiman, who is showrunning the series.

After a close shave with Hollywood courtesy of Terry Gilliam and derailed by 9/11, it took the combined financial muscle and creative ambition of Amazon and the BBC for it to come to screen with an astonishing cast in tow, from Frances McDormand as God to Benedict Cumberbatch as Satan, via Anna Maxwell Martin’s Beelzebub and Jon Hamm’s Archangel Gabriel. It is produced by Amazon Studios, BBC Studios, Blank Corporation and Narrativia.

Leading the spectacular ensemble are the men trying to avert Armageddon and avoid an unwanted return to their desk jobs: Michael Sheen’s upstanding, eccentric angel Aziraphale and David Tennant’s louche, dangerous demon Crowley, sparring partners ever since Crowley persuaded Eve to eat that apple.

David Tennant as louche demon Crowley and Michael Sheen as eccentric angel Aziraphale

“I knew how much Michael loved Good Omens,” Gaiman recalls, “so I had dinner with him and asked if I could send him scripts. He rapidly came on board and once we had Michael Sheen, everybody else just went, ‘Oh, okay – it’s real.’ I had to talk Michael into being the angel, because you could absolutely have gone the other way with him as Crowley and David as Aziraphale. They love the idea that, if ever we did this as a stage production somehow, they would swap roles each night.”

“I’ve always been interested in how we portray goodness,” says Sheen, looking striking indeed with a bleached blond barnet (“I now find myself going, ‘Ooh, look at my roots!’”), tartan bowtie and flannel trousers. “The stereotype is that it’s fun to play the baddie because evil’s interesting and goodness is just boring. Certainly, there’s something holier-than-thou about Aziraphale, but over the course of the story the edges get knocked off him a bit. For someone who’s eternal, actually he does change as the piece goes on.”

“I didn’t know the book, I’m ashamed to say,” admits Tennant, deeply unsettling with prescription yellow contact lenses (“They’re prescription, which helps”), enormous orange quiff and snakeskin boots. But he has been made aware of the pressure being applied by its authors’ dedicated fans.

“Nina Sosanya [playing Sister Mary Loquacious] said, ‘I would have done anything to be in this. It’s my favourite book of all time.’ That’s the sort of refrain I keep hearing. So of course, once you realise you hold something so precious to people in your hand, you don’t want to disappoint them, while still bringing it to a wider audience. I’m sure some people will be furious and some people will be utterly delighted. All you can do is do your best.”

Miranda Richardson as medium and part-time sex worker Madame Tracey

The presence of one of its creators doesn’t hurt, of course. “He’s like a very kind and gentle surgeon,” enthuses Miranda Richardson, fresh from playing with a “thundergun.” “He’ll come up and say something like, ‘The trick is this…’ or ‘Think about this…’ It’s not that you’re doing anything wrong, he’s just adding to the mix.”

Outside the tent, the towering Death stalks by with a cheery smile, green mask off (and to be replaced by a CGI’d skull in the final edit, along with the voice of Brian Cox), while War waves a fiery sword around. It has started to drizzle, but the mood remains upbeat.

“Laughter keeps you going on days like today,” Richardson adds. She plays Madame Tracey, a medium, part-time sex worker and “generous person.” “She comes from a very good place and becomes a vessel for Aziraphale who at one point is looking for a body and a voice.”

Mad Men star Jon Hamm plays Archangel Gabriel

“My character is also a vessel, but more like a leaky canteen,” says Michael McKean, who plays the Scottish Sergeant Shadwell, the last witchfinder standing. “He’s given himself over, because no one else wants him, to the eradication of witches on this earth. He looks upon life with a very jaundiced eye.”

The Spinal Tap star’s accent has been monitored throughout by Scots Mackinnon and Tennant, the latter of whom “commends it to the roof.” Shadwell’s sidekick has also been preoccupied with accents – his quailing mentee, Newton Pulsifer, is played by Jack Whitehall.

“It’s not a posh character – finally!” laughs Whitehall. “In terms of the costume I went down the Harry Potter route in the hope that it would help me put to bed some of the dreams that I still have. I got to use my northern accent for Newt’s ancestor, who I also play. I’ve been honing it for a long time. I always want to throw in a ‘yah!’ but I resist!”

Newton Pulsifer gives Jack Whitehall the chance to try an accent

Aria Arjona plays Anathema Device, a descendant of the witch who correctly predicted the end of the world and was burnt at the stake by Shadwell and Newt’s ancestors. The Puerto Rican True Detective actor has found filming in the UK to be eye-opening. “It’s a completely different style of working than in America – a little more technical, and the schedules are crazy, but everything ends up being done. For Anathema, like all my characters, the wardrobe is what gets me there. Once I put the boots on it all fell into place. She has a kind of wire up her spine, a tension which came as soon as I got them on.”

Speaking of tension, the uneasy geopolitical situation has ensured the series, which debuts worldwide on Amazon Prime Video tomorrow before rolling out on BBC2 in the UK, feels regrettably topical. “It’s quite a tonic to come to work and almost be making a joke of the end of the world,” says Tennant. “I think probably we all need to do that. I just pray we make it to transmission…”

“It’s never a bad time to re-establish why it’s good that we don’t all blow each other up,” Sheen concludes. “Good Omens is very British about the end of the world, and there’s something reassuring about that.”

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Goodbye Broadchurch

It’s the beginning of the end for Broadchurch as the third and final season debuts on ITV. Stars David Tennant and Olivia Colman and creator Chris Chibnall reflect on the show’s success.

It’s an increasingly common trend in television drama that viewers head into a new season of their favourite show knowing it will be the last time they will visit this set of characters. Fans of the past two seasons of Broadchurch will know, however, that the show’s third and final season is unlikely to be a happy occasion for many of the residents of the coastal town.

Still picking up the pieces from the events of season one and two, in which – spoiler alert – Joe Miller killed schoolboy Danny Latimer but was subsequently found not guilty in court, season three sees DI Alec Hardy (David Tennant) and DS Ellie Miller (Olivia Colman), pictured above, investigating a serious sexual assault in the community.

Chris Chibnall

Jodie Whittaker and Andrew Buchan return to play Beth and Mark Latimer. They are joined by Julie Hesmondhalgh, Lenny Henry and Georgina Campbell along with Sarah Parish, Charlie Higson and Mark Bazeley.

Arthur Darvill also returns as local vicar Paul Coates, Carolyn Pickles as newspaper editor Maggie Radcliffe and Adam Wilson as Ellie’s son Tom.

All eight episodes have once again been written by series creator Chris Chibnall. Broadchurch is produced by Kudos, Imaginary Friends and Sister Pictures for ITV, and distributed by Endemol Shine Distribution, which has sold it to 180 countries worldwide. Remakes have been produced in the US (Gracepoint) and France (Malaterra).

“When Chris first sent me the script for the opening episode of Broadchurch six years ago, I was struck by one defining element,” says executive producer Jane Featherstone. “I loved the characters, I loved the beauty of the world, I loved the powerful whodunit narrative, but above all I loved the way it explored a small-town community in such depth. Chris’s intention was always to inhabit a space that meant we could stay with our characters and our town after the crime had happened, to really examine the long-term effects of a tragic incident on a community. Our characters had lives before we joined them and they will continue to exist after we have gone.

“The great privilege of longform storytelling is building a meaningful relationship between our characters and the audience, and I am excited for the audience to see how Ellie, Hardy and the Latimers have fared in the last few years. It is a fond farewell for those of us involved in the series for so many years but, as far as I am concerned, the community of Broadchurch will carry on living long after we’ve gone.”

Chibnall describes the series as an “extraordinary journey” that now comes to an end with a new investigation into a serious sexual assault. Since second season finished in 2015, he has been working with script executive Samantha Hoyle and support organisations, police and survivors to research the storyline.

“I wanted to tell this story because these crimes are increasing,” he says. “Representations of, and attitudes to, sex have become more oppositional and confrontational. Sexualised images are all around, access to porn is easier and seemingly more common. It’s an issue for couples, for parents and families, for individuals and for communities. And, amid all this, the gender divide often feels more polarised than it has in decades.

The third season of Broadchurch follows the investigation into a serious sexual assault

“To explore this, I needed to call on DS Ellie Miller and DI Alec Hardy one last time. This story begins three years after we were last in Broadchurch. Lives have moved on. Some people have left, some have arrived – and there’s a new case to test this old partnership. There are new suspects, new revelations and fresh truths to be confronted in the lives of Broadchurch’s residents.”

Former Doctor Who star Tennant admits he will miss Broadchurch, playing DI Hardy and working alongside his co-stars.

“It is sad to think we will never return to this world and to these characters because I feel so fondly towards them, but I will always feel proud to be associated with this show,” he says.

“There is a massive personal legacy having worked on this show. We all feel like we have been doing something very special and that we are all a part of each other’s lives now, so I’ll miss seeing people every day but hopefully I will see them fairly regularly. I will certainly miss Chris’s scripts but I look forward to watching them elsewhere and I hope it won’t be the last time we will work together.”

Season three sees Tennant’s police officer more settled in Broadchurch, with more focus on his relationship with his daughter Daisy as he rallies against the attacker he is hunting down.

“His focus becomes trying to understand the person who would commit this crime, trying to get inside their skin, and that is something he struggles with initially,” Tennant adds. “That has been an interesting conflict to play, Hardy trying to come to terms with what sort of man would do this and almost feeling ashamed for his own gender, which has been a very interesting take that Chris has afforded him this series.”

Sarah Parish and Lenny Henry have joined the high-profile cast for the new season

Part of the charm of watching Broadchurch has been the chemistry between DI Hardy and Colman’s DS Miller – and Colman says this is purely down to her being such good friends with Tennant.

“Chris Chibnall has written them brilliantly,” she says. “They are really good mates – possibly each other’s only mate. It feels like they have been friends for longer than they have, the way they bicker but they clearly deeply respect each other and would staunchly defend each other against other people.

“It really helps that David and I get on so well. You can sort of tell that Hardy and Ellie like being together because David and I like spending time together. It makes it much easier. I will miss working with David – if we could stand next to each other on set every day, I would be so happy. We giggle, he is never late, knows all of his lines… He is a dream person to work with.”

The topics raised in season three also struck a chord with Colman, who has experience with the subject of sexual violence from previous roles.

“So I have become passionate about all of these issues – violence against each other, and that ties in with sexual assault obviously,” she explains. “I’m really pleased to be a part of this story and it’s amazing how people don’t know how common this is. People need to know, I think.”

From the chilling opening of season one, where the body of a young boy is found on the beach, to the nail-biting court case of season two, Broadchurch has always kept viewers on the edge of their seats and, with more shocking revelations to come in season three, it looks like it will do so once more.

Chibnall adds: “It’s been a strange, mad honour to experience the passion of audiences for this story and these characters. But all good stories come to an end. I hope this one has enough twists and turns, laughter and tears to go out in style.”

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