Tag Archives: Dan Fogelman

Westworld and The Crown head Golden Globe noms

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association has revealed the nominations for its annual Golden Globe film and TV awards – the next edition of which will be held in February 2017.

Some TV shows on the shortlists seem to have become permanent fixtures, notably Game of Thrones, Transparent and Veep. But there will also be stiff competition from a range of excellent new shows.

Westworld’s viewing figures improved as the debut season reached its climax

A key contender in the Best Television Series – Drama category is HBO’s Westworld, which also picked up nominations in two other categories. Created by husband-and-wife team Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, the show has just finished its first season with an average of 1.8 million (same-day viewing). However, the most encouraging thing about the show is that its audience has been rising since episode five, with the finale achieving the show’s best ratings to date (2.2 million). All of which bodes well for the second, which is likely to air in 2018.

Also in the running is Netflix’s royal epic The Crown, which we discussed last week. Written by Peter Morgan, the show is up for Best Television Series – Drama as well as two acting gongs. It’s 10 years since Morgan received an Oscar nomination for The Queen, so perhaps now would be a fitting time for him to win a top award for his royal endeavours. With an IMDb score of 9.0 and superb reviews, it’s another incredibly strong contender.

Arguably the surprise package of the year has been another Netflix show, Stranger Things, which also finished its first season with an IMDb score of 9. Up for awards in two categories (including Best TV Drama), the show follows the disappearance of a young boy at the same time as the appearance of a girl with telekinetic powers.

The Duffer Brothers’ Stranger Things was one of the hits of the year

The show was created by the Duffer Brothers, who featured in this DQ feature on 1980s-inspired TV. Commenting on the Netflix relationship, Ross Duffer said: “They have been incredibly supportive of our vision from the very beginning, and they’ve placed so much trust in us. We also just love Netflix as a platform, because it allows people to watch the show at their own pace. This story is not necessarily intended to be watched over eight weeks. The hope is that people will get hooked and the crescendo will feel even more impactful when it’s watched over a relatively short period of time. We want the audience to feel like they’re watching an epic summer movie.”

The Best TV Drama category is rounded out by the much feted Game of Thrones (David Benioff and DB Weiss) and This Is Us, the only one of the five shows that airs on a free-to-air network in the US (NBC). The latter has been one of the strongest-performing new shows of the 2016/2017 season and is very likely to be renewed for a second season.

It was created by Dan Fogelman, whose credits include Tangled, Cars and Crazy, Stupid, Love. Fogelman also wrote Fox’s new drama Pitch and is waiting to see if that show has done well enough to secure a renewal.

Dan Fogelman’s This Is Us

Battling it out for Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television are American Crime, The Dresser, The Night Manager, The Night Of and The People v OJ Simpson: American Crime Story.

ABC’s American Crime, recently commissioned for a third season, is the creation of John Ridley, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of 12 Years a Slave. It is pretty well regarded by critics but is unlikely to come out ahead of some of the other shows in this category.

FX’s American Crime Story: The People v OJ Simpson, winner of five Emmys, is probably the one to beat. Created by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski, it has been nominated in three categories at this year’s Globes.

That said, the Golden Globes isn’t shy of choosing outsiders – as it did last year when it gave Mr Robot, Mozart in the Jungle and Wolf Hall the top drama awards. Wolf Hall’s success in this category last year provides encouragement for the British nominees – The Night Manager, written by David Farr based on the John Le Carre novel; and The Dresser, the latest adaptation of Ronald Harwood’s acclaimed 1980 play of the same name (written for screen and adapted by Richard Eyre).

David Farr

However, both of them will have to go some way to beat HBO’s The Night Of, created by Richard Price and Steven Zaillian. Of course, if The Night Of does win it will owe a debt to the Brits, because it is based on Peter Moffat’s excellent series Criminal Justice (BBC, 2008/2009).

As referenced above, Mozart in the Jungle was the surprise winner of Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy category at last year’s Golden Globes. So it’s hard to predict which show will come out on top this time out. Mozart, created by Alex Timbers, Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman and Paul Weitz, is in the running again, as are Jill Soloway’s Transparent and Armando Iannucci’s Veep, both of which are strong contenders.

This is, however, a category where the Globes could make a positive statement in favour of diversity, with both Atlanta and Black-ish on its shortlist.

Donald Glover’s Atlanta has been a success for FX this year, generating an 8.7 rating on IMDb and bedding in with a respectable 880,000 average audience for season one. ABC’s Black-ish is now in season three and hovers around the five million mark. Created by Kenya Barris, the show has been a solid performer but would be a surprising winner.

Donald Glover

The five dramas that received nominations in Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama were Mr Robot, Better Call Saul, The Americans, Ray Donovan and Goliath. In other words, a completely different line-up to the overall best drama category. This contrasts with Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy, where the only divergence from the overall category was a nomination for Graves instead of Veep. This is explained by the fact that the heartbeat of Veep is Julia Louis-Dreyfus, nominated in the actress category. If there’s a conclusion to be drawn out here, it’s that there is generally closer alignment between creator and cast in comedy series.

In terms of shows that have been overlooked this year, the Globes didn’t pay much attention to Fox’s Empire and Netflix’s much-feted Orange is the New Black. The mood also seems to have moved away from Shondaland dramas for the time being.

In fact, viewed from the perspective of writers, it’s been a pretty poor year for women, with Lisa Joy and Jill Soloway the only two high-profile female figures to be involved in the headline categories. It’s a reminder that supporting diversity has many dimensions.

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In full swing

With two of the most anticipated new US shows to his name in dramedy This Is Us and baseball series Pitch, Dan Fogelman is hoping to hit a home run this year.

Somewhere in LA, Dan Fogelman is in a car travelling between the sets of two of the hottest new US dramas airing this fall. The reason? He created them both.

The first, NBC’s ensemble drama This Is Us, is described as a “refreshingly honest and provocative” series that follows the lives of a group of people who share the same birthday. The cast includes Milo Ventimiglia, Sterling K Brown and Mandy Moore.

Dan Fogelman
Dan Fogelman

Working with Rick Singer, Fogelman also co-created Pitch (pictured top), a baseball drama on Fox that stars Kylie Bunbury as the first woman to play Major League Baseball (MLB) when she is called up by the San Diego Padres. Both shows are produced by 20th Century Fox Television and distributed by 20th Century Fox Distribution

“I don’t know what I call my job,” Fogelman jokes. “I’m all over the place.”

But to him, it’s no surprise he’s now working on two shows – the only new series to which he was attached during the 2016 pilot season. “I expected them to go [to series],” he admits, having seen his previous shows Galavant (ABC) and Grandfathered (Fox) both cancelled earlier this year. “I felt confident in the premises and the people who were involved.

“As soon as we got the calls, I just tried to get people in right away to map out the whole seasons for both shows. Everybody ends up in the same boat – getting the phone call in May, putting together the writers room in June and July – and after that, it’s out of control because you’re shooting, writing, preparing, editing and breaking stories all at the same time.”

If you think bringing two new dramas to air at the same time is hard enough, Fogelman is also working under a huge weight of expectation, particularly with This Is Us. Ahead of the series’ September 20 launch, the This Is Us trailer, released online in May, had racked up more than 100 million views. NBC subsequently placed a full 18-episode season order before episode two aired.

“I love the show so much,” says Fogelman, who is showrunning the series. “The pressure is self-creating! It’s very special; it’s unique. The show taps into something. I was just hoping [the trailer] didn’t build expectations beyond what’s possible – I hoped people would keep a level head.”

Fogelman has previously described the show as “Lost as a dramedy,” building on the same themes of love, life and friendship that were present in his 2011 rom-com movie Crazy Stupid Love. He explains: “The series plays with time quite a bit and the interconnectedness of all the characters. Lost always did a good job playing with time and connecting unrelated characters in interesting ways. We’re being really ambitious with the storytelling. Our main focus is on the main characters but, because we’re playing with time, the way everything is interconnected is complicated. You see things and learn how they are affecting present-day issues.”

In particular, balancing the tone of the series has proven one of the biggest challenges: “The characters are sentimental without being saccharine; they move people without being manipulative,” the writer says. “It’s a high-wire act.”

But perhaps, if the number of trailer views is anything to go by, This Is Us offers the kind of story audiences are yearning for amid the recent slew of superhero and fantasy dramas.

This Is Us
This Is Us follows the lives of a group of people with the same birthday

“I have been saying for while that 20 years ago there weren’t comic book movies or superheroes on TV,” Fogelman explains. “There tends to be a groundswell for things that aren’t around as much. It’s inspired by TV from the 1980s and films of the 1970s like Kramer and Kramer and Terms of Endearment, which aren’t being made as much.

“It’s got to be special if it’s going to work. There’s so much on with TV and film. If you’re not doing something really well, I don’t think you have a big chance of succeeding. I’m still mystified by the response to the trailer!”

But compared with This Is Us, Pitch is a whole new ballgame, not just because of its storyline but also due the fact it is the first scripted series to be officially associated with MLB. It debuted on Fox on September 22 and will complete its initial 10-episode run on December 8.

“Without MLB, it would have been a no-go for me,” says Fogelman, who reveals that the idea for Pitch was initially developed as a movie before being moved to the small screen.

“It was a complicated deal. At times, people were asking if I’d do it without MLB, with fictional teams. That was a non-starter for me. I’m less interested in that show. My vision was to have a very authentic show about a special young woman making it in the major leagues. Without that it just felt false. We needed MLB and we needed to find the girl. I would have passed on it or pushed it aside without one of those things.”

With a licensing deal in place to use real teams and real stadia – the Padres’ own Petco Park was taken over by the production for 10 days to film the pilot before the baseball season started in April – the other piece of the jigsaw was finding the star.

Pitch
Pitch stars Kylie Bunbury

“It was a long process to find Kylie,” Fogelman explains. “We were scouring everywhere – LA, New York, checking acting schools all over the country. We were reaching out to university softball and athletic teams but we weren’t finding what we were looking for. We met interesting actors but so many boxes needed to be ticked in terms of acting believability, athleticism and the ability to carry a TV show. They weren’t checking all the boxes. One day, Kylie came in to read and then, later on, I watched her tape back and knew she was the one.”

As Ginny Baker (Bunbury) makes her debut for the Padres in the pilot, viewers might question where the series could take her in the future. But Fogelman, who is an executive producer on the series, is reassured that there is a “road map” in place to take the series into multiple seasons.

“The story of Pitch is a young woman becoming the first woman to move into the MLB,” he says. “The rest of the season goes from being about the first woman to make it, to what kind of woman she is going to become and where she makes friendships and relationships. How is she going to operate in this world? It’s a coming-of-age story. She’s figuring herself out. That was the key part of the show for me.”

Coming from features, Fogelman admits he didn’t grow up in a writers room culture but he has been exposed to the daily grind of television over the past four years,.

“I tell everyone not to be shy and to take ownership,” he says. “A lot of people come from writers rooms where it’s autonomous and they’re nervous all the time. I’m always wary of that. I’m besieged all day by making decisions so I empower everyone I’ve hired to do their own work.”

Directing two films next year, Fogelman’s immediate future will be spent flipping back and forth between big and small screens. “It’s all just storytelling at the end of the day,” he adds, nonchalantly. “But TV is more intimate. Films released into 3,000 theatres aren’t really character-driven, so writers are now more drawn to TV.”

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NBC has strong start with This Is Us

This Is Us
Season one of This Is Us will now comprise 18 episodes

After a promising debut for This Is Us, NBC has given the new drama an additional five episodes, taking the total number of instalments for the first season to 18. The decision was made on the eve of the show’s second episode.

Citing Live+5-day data, NBC said the show’s premiere attracted 14.3 million viewers. It also set records on NBC’s digital platform.

Commenting on the decision to extend the show from its initial 13-episode order, NBC’s Jennifer Salke said: “It’s a rare moment in this business when a show so instantly delivers both critical acclaim and hit ratings, but This Is Us is just such an achievement. Creator Dan Fogelman, along with co-directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa and the producers, cast and crew, has delivered the kind of heart and depth that resonates with every segment of the audience and we’re proud to extend it.”

This Is Us is also making waves in the international market, with Channel 4 in the UK picking up the show last week. Jay Hunt, Channel 4’s chief creative officer, said: “This Is Us is unmissably life affirming with a warmth that has drawn critical acclaim and bumper ratings. It’s a great addition to our slate of acquired shows – from Deutschland 83 to Fargo.”

Fogelman’s other new series, Pitch, hasn’t had such a bright start, however. The story of the first-ever female Major League Baseball pitcher, the show was one of Fox’s weaker performers last week, bringing in 4.2 million viewers.

It has had a decent amount of critical approval, which means it will almost certainly complete its initial 13-episode run, but it will need to win over audiences quickly to secure an extended run or second season.

The first episode of CBS's Macgyver reboot picked up almost 11 million viewers
The first episode of CBS’s Macgyver reboot picked up almost 11 million viewers

Among the other new US series to have hit the air, CBS reboot MacGyver has had a strong start, securing an audience of around 10.9 million for its first episode. This is the best performance by a Friday-night scripted series on the network since Hawaii Five-0 in 2014.

With the show’s debut clearly benefiting from in-built name awareness, it will be interesting to see if it manages to hold on to that number through episodes two and three. If it does, it means the revival is an inspired move. If it drops away quickly, it will resemble ABC’s experience with The Muppets last year – namely a strong start followed by rapid loss of audience interest.

The fate of MacGyver may have some influence on whether the big four US networks continue to look at reviving classic series. Others currently in the works are The Rockford Files and LA Law, and success for MacGyver will certainly mean more.

By contrast to MacGyver, ABC’s Notorious has started very badly and looks like a prime candidate for early cancellation. Fox’s reboot of The Exorcist, with 2.9 million viewers, has also started slowly but may find its niche in international distribution because of its name recognition and supernatural subject matter.

Still in the US, FX has revealed that season four of its vampire virus series The Strain will be the last. The Strain’s writer and showrunner  is Carlton Cuse, who is also coming to the end of A&E’s Bates Motel.

The Strain will conclude with its fourth outing
The Strain will conclude with its fourth outing

There had been talk of The Strain operating to a five-season story arc, but four seasons is probably enough to play the concept out. Strong in season one, the pace and direction of the narrative started to falter in season two – something that has been reflected in the ratings.

The downward path of the ratings tells the story. While season one averaged 2.2 million, season two came in at 1.34 million (this season also suffered from an awkward piece of recasting). Now in season three, the show is averaging 1.1 million but the latest episode attracted just 880,000 – the sign of a franchise coming to the end of its life.

Elsewhere, it has been a busy week for Australian drama. On the domestic front, Nine Network has commissioned a second season of Doctor Doctor, a local comedy drama about a formerly high-flying surgeon who is forced to work as a GP in the small country town where he grew up. The series, which sounds similar to DRG’s hit format Doc Martin, was only two episodes into the first season when Nine announced the recommission.

The show’s synopsis says: “When he is knocked off his pedestal and on to the Impaired Registrants Programme, prodigal Sydney surgeon and party boy Hugh Knight must return to his home in rural Whyhope where he might learn to swallow his pride and mend his ways – or not.”

Deep Water has been picked up by Acorn
Deep Water has been picked up by Acorn

Meanwhile, US-based SVoD platform Acorn has acquired two Australian series from distributor DCD Rights. The first is Deep Water, a four-part series inspired by a crime wave targeting gay people in Sydney’s coastal communities in the 1980s and 90s. The show is a Blackfella Films production for SBS Broadcasting Australia, Screen Australia and Screen New South Wales.

Acorn TV has also picked up the second season of political thriller The Code, which is produced by Playmaker Media for Australian public broadcaster ABC. Both series have also been acquired by BBC4 in the UK, a channel that is often used as a barometer of whether a show has international sales potential.

Finally, some desperately sad news this week with the untimely death of Gary Glasberg, executive producer/showrunner of NCIS and creator/executive producer of NCIS: New Orleans. Glasberg, just 50 years old, died suddenly in his sleep on September 28.

A well-liked figure, Glasberg joined NCIS in 2009 and helped confirm its status as one of the biggest drama hits in the world – a huge ratings success in the US and widely distributed internationally.

Gary Glasberg
Gary Glasberg

His previous credits included The Mentalist, Crossing Jordan and Bones.

“Today is an overwhelmingly sad day for NCIS, CBS and anyone who was blessed to spend time with Gary Glasberg,” said CBS president of entertainment Glenn Geller. “We have lost a cherished friend, gifted creative voice, respected leader and, most memorably, someone whose warmth and kindness was felt by all around him. Our heartfelt thoughts and sympathies go out to his wife, Mimi, his two sons and all his family and friends.”

CBS TV Studios president David Stapf added: “He brought kindness, integrity and class to everything he did. His remarkable talent as a writer and producer was only matched by his ability to connect with people.”

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